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Step-by-Step Guide to Becoming a Psychologist

From college education requirements to choosing a specialization and getting your license, follow these key steps to become a professional psychologist.

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In 2018, there were over 181,000 practicing psychologists in the U.S. and this number is expected to increase by 14% over the next decade. Becoming a psychologist requires several years of education, focus, and determination. However, the reward of earning your license and being able to assist people every day makes the process worthwhile. If you are interested in pursuing a career in psychology but are unsure of where to start or what it entails, you have come to the right place. Here, you can learn step-by-step what is required, from beginning your undergraduate degree and selecting a psychology specialization to obtaining your state license.

FAQs About Becoming a Psychologist

How long does it take to become a psychologist?

The duration of the path to becoming a psychologist varies depending on the type of psychologist you aspire to be. Several psychologist positions require a PhD or PsyD degree coupled with a post-doctoral fellowship, while others mandate a master’s degree. The table below provides an overview of the duration of some popular psychology paths, but keep in mind that these are general estimates. The actual timeline is subject to the degree program you select, your individual state licensing criteria, and your own progress.

College EducationPost-Degree Supervised Work ExperienceETA to Career Start
Clinical Psychologist8-12 years1-2 years9-14 years
Counseling Psychologist8-12 years1-2 years9-14 years
Forensic Psychologist8-12 years1 year9-13 years
Industrial-Organizational Psychologist6 years0-1 years6-7 years
School Psychologist5-6 years1 year6-7 years

What qualifications do you need to become a psychologist?

The qualifications required for different fields of psychology and state-specific licensing criteria vary. At a minimum, all major psychology professions demand a master’s or Education Specialist degree, but the majority also necessitate a doctoral-level degree and a substantial amount of supervised work experience. It’s essential to consider this when selecting a path that aligns with your personal, professional, and academic objectives. In some roles, professional certification is mandatory, while in others, it’s highly recommended. Before obtaining their license, students typically need to pass an exam mandated by their state. The most common exam is the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP).

How much money does a psychologist make?

The salary of psychologists is influenced by various factors, such as their degree level, psychology specialization, experience, location, and employer. The chart below provides a general sense of what to expect.

10th PercentileMedian National Annual Salary90th Percentile
Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists1$45,240$78,200$132,670
Forensic Psychologists2$39,000$69,596$101,000
Industrial-Organizational Psychologist1$51,080$92,880$197,700

Sources:

1. Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2019
2. PayScale, April 2020

Step 1

Make Sure Becoming a Psychologist Is Really for You

Pursuing a career in psychology demands significant dedication and a readiness to sacrifice leisure time for several years as you pursue the necessary degrees. It also involves a significant financial investment. It’s crucial to assess whether the work of a psychologist aligns with your interests and skills before proceeding further. We’ve provided a few questions to help you figure out if this is the best path for you.

  • Do you enjoy school and learning enough to complete all of the degrees required to work as a psychologist?
  • Do you enjoy conducting research and learning about new studies and data findings that can inform your work?
  • Does the thought of maintaining an active client roster and working with many different types of people appeal to you?
  • Can you see yourself in this position for a long time?
  • Does the average salary meet your requirements for a profession?

If you answered “yes” to most of the questions above, a career as a psychologist is likely a good choice for you.

Step 2

Explore Psychology Specializations and Map Out Your Degree Path

Before starting college, taking time to research the available specializations within the psychology profession can help you determine the type of degree you’ll need and how long it will take to meet all requirements. The American Psychological Association officially recognizes 17 psychology specializations and three proficiencies. Here’s a closer look at some of the most popular specializations:

Clinical Psychologist

Clinical psychologists assist individuals with moderate to severe psychological disorders, but the scope of their job can vary from direct psychotherapy to scientific research and consulting. Clinical psychologists can also specialize further by treating particular populations such as children or veterans. They typically work in research labs, universities, hospitals, mental health clinics, or in private practice. Clinical psychologists must acquire a PhD or PsyD degree to be eligible for licensing.

Best for…

Individuals who want a broad range of professional pathways to help people with more serious mental health problems using a diagnostic approach.

Example Degree Path

Bachelor’s in Psychology Master’s in Clinical Psychology PsyD in Clinical Psychology

Counseling Psychologist

Counseling psychologists concentrate on using their knowledge and expertise to assist people in dealing with everyday issues as they arise, whether they stem from work, family life, or other sources. For instance, they may help clients develop coping mechanisms around stress management or adapt to a significant move to a new city where they don’t know anyone. Like clinical psychologists, a PsyD or PhD doctoral degree is necessary to practice legally.

Best for…

Professionals who like working with others in one-to-one and group settings.

Example Degree Path

Bachelor’s in Psychology Master’s in Counseling Psychology PsyD Counseling Psychology

Forensic Psychologist

Forensic psychologists work at the intersection of psychology and law, using their expertise to aid jurors and judges in making informed decisions within the legal system. They are responsible for tasks such as offering psychological assessments and clarifying psychological concepts. Typically, a doctoral degree is necessary to become a forensic psychologist.

Best for…

People who like solving problems and finding answers to complex questions.

Example Degree Path

Bachelor’s in Criminal Justice Master’s in Forensic Psychology PhD in Forensic Psychology

School Psychologist

School psychologists often work in K-12 settings to help students address issues around behaviors, emotions, family situations, learning, and mental health. They help students learn how to handle difficult situations and build coping skills that can help them succeed in their personal and academic lives. They also work with teachers to build inclusive and safe learning spaces. An Education Specialist (EdS) degree is the minimum education required to become a school psychologist.

Best for…

Professionals who enjoy helping students navigate issues and reach their potential.

Example Degree Path

Bachelor’s in Educational Studies EdS in School Psychology

Industrial-Organizational Psychologist

Industrial-organizational psychologists help companies of all types and sizes find ways of improving efficiency through the study of human behavior. By helping executives understand the motivations, expectations, and needs of their staff, they can work to improve professional environments. This, in turn, creates a more fulfilling work setting and can improve outcomes. Industrial-organizational psychologists typically need at least a master’s degree.

Best for…

People who want to help companies maximize efficiency and effectiveness.

Example Degree Path

Bachelor’s in Human Resources Management Master’s in Industrial-Organizational Psychology PhD in Organizational Psychology

Step 3

Apply for Scholarships and Other Financial Aid

With the cost of college rising each year, and psychology education taking so long to complete, finding ways to cover tuition and fees is more important than ever. Take time to learn about various types of financial aid – including scholarships and student loan forgiveness programs By doing the research now, you may be able to avoid substantial student loan debt.

Step 4

Earn Your Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology or a Related Field

Bachelor’s degrees in psychology and related studies serve as the foundation for your future career as a psychologist. While many students who know they want to work in this field begin their academic journey with an undergraduate psychology degree, it’s not required at this stage. If you want to work as a forensic psychologist, for instance, a criminal justice bachelor’s degree may best suit your needs. Alternatively, those who want to work as a school psychologist may consider an undergraduate degree related to education or teaching.

Many bachelor’s degrees in psychology and related fields exist online, making them a great fit if you prioritize flexibility and accessibility. Aside from educational considerations, your undergraduate years also offer a great opportunity to job shadow practicing psychologists to figure out which psychology specialization appeals most.

Step 5

Pick Your Specialization and Pursue Graduate-Level Studies

After earning a bachelor’s degree, it’s time to pick your specialization and make important decisions about which graduate degree(s) will help you reach your goals. A few options exist, some of which we highlight in the following section.

Master’s in Psychology

Master’s in psychology programs act as a foundation for individuals who aspire to become psychologists, as several PhD and PsyD programs require students to complete this level of training as a prerequisite, particularly for clinical or counseling psychology roles. Master’s in psychology programs are available in both on-campus and online formats, usually taking two years of full-time study, and provide learners with a foundational understanding of the topics they will encounter at the doctoral level.

Education Specialist (EdS) in Psychology

If you want to work as a school psychologist, the educational specialist program is the most popular degree pathway. Some EdS programs require applicants to hold a master’s degree while others accept those with a bachelor’s degree. The amount of time taken to graduate depends on previous education, but you can usually finish requirements in one or two years of full-time study.

Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)

If you plan to work in a clinical setting providing direct treatment, the Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) path is the best doctoral degree option for you. This degree emphasizes studies in practical skills required in counseling and clinical roles as opposed to the PhD, which focuses more on research. Plan to spend between four and six years working towards degree requirements, including at least one year of an internship.