Resources, Scholarships and Support Services for Education & Teaching Majors

From scholarships to help pay for next year’s tuition to articles on how to prepare for student teaching, here’s where to find the financial, academic, and career-prep support you deserve as a teaching and education major.

Last Updated: 11/24/2020

As a teaching or education major, you are preparing to tackle one of the most critical professions in the world. The daily challenges of college life are enough without having to worry about there being resources to support you achieving your goals. Colleges and universities provide this assistance by offering a variety of academic, career, and financial support systems. The thing is, you have to know where to look.

This guide helps education and teaching students, as well as professionals, find basic campus and online support services and provides helpful resources, including professional associations, student organizations, and social media and other online communities. It also identifies how to find and apply for scholarships and other options for financing your education.

Campus and Online Support Resources for Education and Teaching Students

Whether you are an education and teaching student, or a professional advancing your teaching career, questions and even hardships can arise. Effective time management, personal well-being, and financial woes are just a few of the issues often encountered. The following resources can help you maintain your grades and your mental/emotional health while becoming a better educator. Many of these resources are available before, during, and after attending college, so be sure to take advantage of them.

University Student Support Centers and Services

Colleges and universities generally have a student support center, often with different departments offering numerous services and support programs for education and teaching students and professionals. Financial aid and academic advice are the most basic resources available. Additionally, most colleges offer assistance to address specific needs, such as disability services, active-military and veteran services, sexual violence support, legal services, technology support, housing services, writing assistance, tutoring, career services, gender and equality support, and even services for getting you home safely. The following two universities deliver exceptional support for education and teaching students.

1

Indiana University Bloomington

The School of Education at Indiana University Bloomington (IU) offers excellent support resources for its education and teaching students. Its Community of Teachers program allows students to work closely with faculty facilitators, attend seminars, develop a portfolio of performance expectations, and gain valuable field experience working with a mentor teacher. IU’s Global Gateway for Teachers program enables you to fulfill student teaching requirement in other countries, in the Navajo Nation, or in the urban center of Chicago, Illinois.  Another interesting program is the Transition to Teaching program that gives specific assistance to those who have a degree in a different field, but would like to switch to a teaching career.

2

Vanderbilt Peabody College

Vanderbilt Peabody College of Education and Human Development features an exceptional selection of services and offices to help education and teaching students get the most out of their training. In addition to common support services, like writing assistance and tutoring, students enjoy access to Vanderbilt’s Office of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion, the Peabody Research Office, and educator-focused Peabody Career Services. Peabody College also makes a concerted effort to connect education and teaching majors with leading education professionals, policymakers, and research scholars to prepare for a career in education.

Articles, Videos, and Podcasts for Education and Teaching Students and Professionals

Angela Watson’s Truth for TeachersThese weekly podcasts provide guidance and motivation for educators at all levels. Topics include educators’ responses and self-care during pandemics, ideas for distance learning scenarios, and how to humanize the classroom so students know they are respected.

The Bedley Bros.The Bedley Bros. podcasts cover current educational topics, including online distance learning, school projects and exercises, and tips, tricks, and techniques for helping students. For example, one episode explains how to teach critical thinking to spot fake news, and one teaches you how to help students avoid the prison system.

Common Sense EducationThis popular YouTube channel includes valuable information for K-12 teaching professionals and students, including instruction techniques, classroom management strategies and tools, teaching news and media literacy, and optimal methods for distance learning.

EdutopiaThis YouTube channel features tips for PK-12 educators and covers a vast array of topics such as personal health, group learning strategies and activities, classroom discussion starters, and social and emotional skills for teachers.

Richard ByrneThis YouTube channel focuses on technology tips for educators. Popular video playlists cover topics such as using Google Earth, Google Meet, how to create videos for lessons, how to use storyboards, and the advantages of online whiteboards.

Science UndergroundThis weekly podcast features two-minute episodes on the STEM topics, the environment, chemistry, and biology. These videos could be useful starting points for lessons.

STEPS: The Student Teaching Survival GuideThis article covers essential knowledge for becoming a successful student teacher. From setting classroom expectations and developing lesson plans to navigating relationships with teaching mentors and school administrators, you’ll receive a quality overview for getting started on the right foot.

TED-EdAffiliated with the well-known TED Talks, TED-Ed is an education-focused YouTube channel. The videos can serve as in-class instructional supplements or help educators develop ideas for classroom instruction.

STEPS: Beginner’s Guide to the PraxisThe Praxis exam is a key element to becoming a professional educator. This article describes the Reading, Mathematics, and Writing sections of the test, explains what the scores mean and how to put your score in perspective, and teaches how to prepare for the exam.

Education and Teaching Professional Associations and Student Organizations

American Federation of Teachers (AFT)The AFT union advocates for students, their families, and the community. Members include early childhood educators, PK-12 teachers, and others who are interested in helping students achieve success. Members gain access to a student loan assistance platform, computer discounts, financial and legal services, and more.

Association of American Educators (AAE)AAE is the largest national organization for empowering and supporting teachers. The site offers a resource library and numerous blogs that non-members can read. Members receive an “Education Matters” newsletter and numerous perks such as scholarship and grant opportunities, legal protection, and access to supplementary insurance policies.

TESOL International AssociationFocused on helping members develop the latest skills for teaching and learning English as a second language, TESOL offers numerous professional development opportunities, including conventions, online courses, certificate programs, publications, and an active job board.

Education and Teaching Social Media and Online Communities

A to Z Teacher StuffThis judgement-free, online forum gives education students a chance to ask questions, while teachers can find assistance with curriculum development, classroom management techniques, and more.

r/Teachers RedditThis Reddit group is a useful forum for asking questions and giving answers to education students and teachers. Discussions on current events and the ways they affect the U.S. educational system are often front and center.

Monica Burns, Ed.D., #EdTechDr. Burns’ Twitter account, @ClassTechTips, is an excellent resource for educators who are interested in learning how to use technology to make their lives easier and increase their effectiveness in the classroom.

Support Resources for Students in Online Education and Teaching Programs

With the growing popularity of online programs, there are now many useful online resources to help you do your best work while earning your degree or advancing your career. Fully online and hybrid students need to develop particular skills and habits to perform at their highest potential. These supportive resources will get you on the right track, save you time and energy, and make your overall learning experience more enjoyable.

Minnesota State CAREERwise: What Makes a Successful Online Learner? This resource explores the best ways to handle the flexibility and convenience of online learning. With the added freedoms of remote learning come additional responsibilities and the need for time management, communication, and technological skills.

Regis College: Seven Tips for Online Learning During Covid-19 This resource helps you make the necessary adjustments for taking online classes and completing assignments so you can stay on-task and avoid unnecessary headaches.

STEPS: Online Education & Teaching Degree Programs This guide offers a list of the top two- and four-year schools, along with tips and advice for education majors in distance learning programs. It also offers an overview of what it costs to attend these programs and the types of degrees that are available online.

STEPS: The Online Student’s Guide to Time Management This guide highly effective time management strategies, techniques, and tools to help you get the most out of your time in an online program.

University of Florida: 10 Tips for Success in Online Classes This list gives great advice on establishing an environment for online success, finding ways to stay motivated, and keeping a positive frame of mind.

College-Sponsored Scholarships in Education and Teaching

There are many notable scholarship and grant opportunities for education and teaching majors. Some of your best options are scholarships that are sponsored by your prospective or current college or university. These awards are typically part of well-established scholarship programs and applying for them is likely easier than for scholarships outside your institution. You can take comfort in knowing the award is designed to support students specifically at your institution and that the school sees it as a worthwhile program to keep in place. To learn more about these opportunities, check with your financial aid office, program director, and scholarship pages on the school’s website. Here are two examples of superb college-sponsored scholarships for education and teaching majors.

1

Duke University

Duke has excellent funding options for its education and teaching majors. The education program offers at least five scholarships for students. If you already have a degree, the Continuing Studies Scholarship pays for 90% of the tuition required to meet the Teaching License requirements.  The Winfred Quinton Holton Prize for Educational Research award is for outstanding and innovative work in education. The school also offers need-based awards through the John Alexander and Lillie Goodman Scott Memorial Scholarship Endowment Fund and the Marilyn Tobias Memorial Scholarship Endowment. The latter award has a preference for women.


Winfred Quinton Holton Prize for Educational Research

Amount

$1,000

Deadline

4/24/21 (Annual)

Eligibility

This award is for Duke undergraduates who have excelled in investigative research in education, curriculum development, or ground-breaking educational projects.

How to Apply

You must include a summary of your entry, the research project or paper being judged, a sealed copy of your Duke transcript, and a letter of support.

2

University of Virginia (UVA)

UVA in Charlottesville, Virginia, is home to the Curry School of Education and Human Development (EHD). Each year, this school offers over a dozen fellowships and scholarships. There are awards for the entire EHD school, for the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education, and for the Department of Educational Leadership, Foundations, and Policy. Students must include a faculty recommendation with each application. Each student fills out an online application form that details their achievements, service to the School of EHD, special talents and interests, and their presentations or publications. Applications must also include a statement that speaks to the specifics of the award for which they are applying.


The Elsie Hughes Cabell Scholarship

Amount

$20,000

Deadline

1/6/21

Eligibility

Applicants must be current students in the Curry School of EHD and demonstrate financial need. The award is competitive and requires excellent academic performance.

How to Apply

Students can apply through the department or contact Marie Pace at mwp6m@virginia.edu for more information.

Private Scholarships in Education and Teaching

There are many scholarships offered by sources outside of schools that are worth your attention. Some of these awards are reserved for students in education and teaching programs. Others are for students who are in financial need, have stellar academic performance, belong to racial minority groups, or a combination thereof. Following is a list of education and teaching scholarships that you can check out right away.

Amount

Varies

Deadline

5/8/21 (Annual)

Eligibility

Applicants must have been accepted to an AMS-approved program.

How to Apply

Applicants must submit a personal statement and three letters of recommendation.

Amount

Up to $2,000

Deadline

9/21/20 (Annual)

Eligibility

This award is for undergraduate students enrolled at an accredited college and high school students who have been accepted to one. They must wish to pursue a career as a physics high-school teacher.

How to Apply

Applicants must create an account with the American Association of Physics Teachers to apply online.

Amount

Varies

Deadline

Early Spring 2021 (Specific deadline TBD)

Eligibility

This award is for future teachers who wish to pursue careers working with children in early childhood school settings.

How to Apply

Applicants must submit transcripts, writing samples, and personal references for consideration.

Amount

One for $2,500 and one for $5,000

Deadline

6/15/21 (Annual)

Eligibility

Tribal members who plan to work with a nation or tribe in an education or social service capacity may apply. Applicants should be juniors in an undergraduate program with a 3.0 or higher GPA.

How to Apply

Applications must include a statement of financial need and all available college transcripts. Contact the scholarship chairman at leslie@khs65.com for more information.

Amount

Up to $4,000

Deadline

10/31/21 (Annual)

Eligibility

This award is designated for students majoring in education who plan to teach in high-need fields that are in low-income school systems. Applicants must be eligible for federal student aid and be enrolled in a TEACH program at a participating educational institution.

How to Apply

Apply online through the government website. There are three listed at the bottom of the above linked website.

Amount

Full cost of attendance

Deadline

9/15/21 (Annual)

Eligibility

U.S. citizens who identify as African American, Indigenous, Asian Pacific Islander, or Hispanic American and who wish to pursue an undergraduate degree in education may apply.

How to Apply

Students can apply online through the Gates Millennium Scholars portal.

Amount

$5,000 – $15,000

Deadline

2/1/21 (Annual)

Eligibility

U.S. citizens may apply for this graduate fellowship provided they have intentions of teaching at the college level upon graduation. Students must be in a liberal art, an education, or a social science program.

How to Apply

Students must submit a hardcopy application for consideration. This “Apply for a Graduate Fellowship page” gives you the details.

Amount

$24,000

Deadline

5/1/2021

Eligibility

Applicants must be graduate students planning on teaching American government, civics, or history. Undergraduate applicants must have their bachelor’s degree by August 31 of the year they apply.

How to Apply

Students apply online and must include a school transcript and at least one letter of recommendation.

Amount

$2,000

Deadline

March 2021 (TBD)

Eligibility

Students must be a current member of the NAACP, be a U.S. citizen under the age of 25, and enrolled in an accredited college or university. Undergraduate applicants should have a 2.5 or higher GPA, while graduate students should have a 3.0 or higher.

How to Apply

Applications are available online at the Poise Foundation’s Online Scholarship Portal.

Amount

$1,000

Deadline

11/15/21 (Annual)

Eligibility

The award is for juniors, seniors, and graduate students with a declared major in elementary education or equivalent.

How to Apply

Applicants must submit a narrative explaining personal experiences that have motivated them to become an elementary teacher and personal traits they have that would serve them in this career. They must also submit official transcripts and a resume that details experience working with children (whether paid or unpaid) and community service work.

Amount

Up to $10,000

Deadline

5/1/21 (Annual)

Eligibility

Applicants must be full-time students who plan on becoming a certified secondary school math teacher. They must have a 3.0 or higher GPA and a current NCTM membership.

How to Apply

The application must have a detailed proposal that includes an essay, budget, background and experience, and letters of support from an academic advisor, academic/professional contact, and personal contact. There are more details in the above link.

Amount

$3,000 – $12,000

Deadline

N/A

Eligibility

Applicants from most disciplines can apply, including those interested in pursuing a career in elementary, secondary, and post-secondary teaching. The awards are reserved for individuals who are legally blind in both eyes.

How to Apply

Applications are submitted online using the Scholarship Program Application Form.

Amount

$2,500

Deadline

5/31/21 (Annual)

Eligibility

Applicants must be graduate education majors in their second semester who plan on teaching a STEM subject. They should be taking at least two classes and possess a 3.5 or higher GPA.

How to Apply

Students apply online and submit their transcripts, two letters of recommendation, a resume, and a personal statement.

Amount

$500

Deadline

4/1/21 (Annual)

Eligibility

Applicants should have an interest in pursuing a career in education and possess a 3.5 or higher GPA.

How to Apply

Online application forms vary depending on the award. Applications must include a personal essay that answers questions on the form.

Amount

$2,500 – $20,000

Deadline

8/31/21 (Annual)

Eligibility

This scholarship is reserved for Black and Hispanic students who commit to teaching in an Indiana-accredited school for three years.

How to Apply

Prospective recipients must submit an online application using a ScholarTrack account and submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Applicants should possess a 2.0 or higher GPA. This how-to application page gives detailed steps.

Tips for Winning an Education or Teaching Scholarship

Education and teaching scholarship applications are highly competitive. In addition to demonstrating you have the right credentials, your application package should follow application instructions to the letter, be clearly written with no grammatical or punctuation errors, and speak to your strengths as an aspiring educator. Keep in mind these tips as you work on your scholarship applications.

  • Tip #1: Highlight all relevant experience
    If you have any teaching experience, even if it falls under non-classroom work such as tutoring, teaching private music lessons, or community service, include this information. The committees use these details when considering how valuable your experience is as a future educator.
  • Tip #2: Make sure the application is complete
    Each scholarship application has different requirements, and some may take time to get. You must include all the required essays, proposals, answers, and documents requested because failure to submit a completed application will likely disqualify you from consideration.
  • Tip #3: Your personal essay matters
    If asked to include a personal essay or proposal, make sure you stand out in the crowd of applicants. Be impeccable. This is your time to shine and explain clearly why you’re the best choice. This original piece enables you to reach the committee in a personally meaningful way.
  • Tip #4: Take a scholarship workshop
    There are many online and in-person resources for students in your position. Whether you pay a professional to coach to walk you through the process or improve your writing skills by learning from credible video sources, it’s worth the extra effort to improve your applications.
  • Tip #5: Request letters of recommendation as soon as possible
    Give your recommendation resources at least two months to complete and get their letter to you. Remember that you might need to review the letter and ask for a revision, so the more time you give them, the better.

Other Ways to Get Help Paying for College as an Education and Teaching Major

There are other options for financial assistance. Consider the following:

  • Federal and Private Loans: Through the federal government, you can get direct subsidized loans, direct unsubsidized loans, direct PLUS loans, and direct consolidation loans. Like private loans, you’ll need to repay the borrowed money plus interest. Usually, government loans are easier to get, safer, and more affordable than private loans.
  • Work-Study Jobs: These are federally funded, part-time jobs for students in financial need. You might even get transferable work skills and a few good references. Check with your school’s financial aid office for more information.

For more information on your financial options, take a look at our financial aid guide and public service student loan forgiveness guide.